OCEAN'S SEVEN

 
  • image The North Channel (known in Irish and Scottish Gaelic as Sruth na Maoile, and alternatively in English as the Straits of Moyle or Sea of Moyle) is the strait between north-eastern Ireland and south-western Scotland. Read More

    North Channel

  • image Cook Strait lies between the North and South Islands of New Zealand. It connects the Tasman Sea on the northwest with the South Pacific Ocean on the southeast. It is 14 miles wide at its narrowest point,‪ and has an average depth of 420 feet.‬ Read More

    Cook Strait

  • image The Moloka'i Channel (also known as the Ka'iwi Channel, meaning the Channel of Bones) is a waterway between the islands of O'ahu and Moloka'i in Hawaii. The channel is 26 miles wide and its maximum depth is 2300 feet. Read More

    Moloka'i Channel

  • image The English Channel (French: Manche, "Sleeve"), also called simply the Channel, is the body of water that separates southern England from northern France, and joins the southern part of the North Sea to the Atlantic Ocean. Read More

    English Channel

  • image The Catalina Channel, also known as the San Pedro Channel, is a 20.2-mile (32.5 km) waterway located between Santa Catalina Island and Southern California, USA. Due to strong currents, athletes will have to swim a longer distance in order to cross it. Read More

    Catalina Channel

  • image The Tsugaru Strait (津軽海峡 Tsugaru Kaikyō?) is a strait between Honshu and Hokkaido Islands in northern Japan, connecting the Sea of Japan with the Pacific Ocean. The Seikan Tunnel passes under it at its narrowest point, 12.1 miles between Tappi Misaki on the Tsugaru Peninsula in Honshu, and Shirakami Misaki on the Matsumae Peninsula in Hokkaido. Read More

    Tsugaru Strait

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Swimmers cross US-Mexico border to support immigrants

ABC News. Tijuana México, 5 de Mayo 2017. 

Twelve athletes swam across the border from the United States to Mexico in a show of solidarity with immigrants amid a charged political climate.

Swimmers from the United States, Mexico, Israel, New Zealand and South Africa were escorted by a Mexican Navy ship as they reached a beach in Tijuana, a short distance from a border fence that juts into the Pacific Ocean. More than 100 schoolchildren cheered, and Mexico's top immigration official in the region applauded them at a public celebration of the 10-kilometer (6.2-mile) swim from Imperial Beach, California.

Organizer Kim Chambers of New Zealand, who is living in San Francisco as a legal permanent resident of the U.S., was overwhelmed by the jubilant reception.

"At the end of the day, water connects all of us," she said. "It doesn't matter which way you're going."

Chambers, 39, came up with the idea shortly after a group swim across the Red Sea from Jordan to Israel to raise environmental awareness. She said it wasn't a protest, but an atmosphere of what she called negativity after the election of President Donald Trump was the catalyst.

The swim raised money for the Colibri Center for Human Rights, a Tucson, Arizona, group that helps families identify immigrants who die on the perilous trek across the border.

Rodulfo Figueroa, Mexico's top immigration official in Baja California state, told the swimmers that their exercise was a "very nice symbol." Mexican authorities examined their passports before they launched from California.

"We are closer than it seems at times," said Figueroa, regional delegate of Mexico's National Immigration Institute, who was joined by Tijuana city officials.

American kayakers accompanied the swimmers to the U.S.-Mexico line, where an iconic fence shoots out into the Pacific Ocean.

Chambers toyed with the idea of swimming from Mexico to the United States and going back and forth but decided that going from the U.S. to Mexico would be the least complicated path.

The U.S. Border Patrol, which is always on alert for swimmers, kayakers and surfers trying to sneak in the country, said organizers would have been required to enter the country through an official border crossing.

More information: http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/swimmers-cross-us-mexico-border-support-immigrants-47234722

 

 

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